Items

Emeralds


Dec value: 388
Hex value: 184
Maximum stack 64

Emeralds are obtained by either mining the extremely rare emerald ore, or by trading items with villagers. They currently only serve one purpose, which is as a currency.

Villagers will sell you a variaty of items for various amounts of emeralds. This is a nice way to spend any emeralds you may have found, though it’s generally not really worth it to farm the emeralds specifically to trade, as it’s a lot easier to simply get the items yourself. However, blacksmith villagers do sell chainmail armour, which is otherwise unobtainable.

Coal


Dec value: 263
Hex value: 107
Burning time: 80 seconds
Maximum stack 64

Coal can be obtained by mining coal ore blocks, which can be found all over minecraft in large quantities. Each coal ore block will drop only 1 lump of coal. A pickaxe is required to harvest coal. It can also be found in chests in strongholds and abandoned mineshafts.

Coal is used to create fire charges and torches, as well as acting as a fuel in furnaces and powered minecarts.

Fuel efficiency

Coal is one of the less efficient fuels, depending on the circumstances. While coal can be found almost anywhere, charcoal and wooden planks are often much easier to farm in larger quantities, which often make them more time efficient.

Lava buckets are pretty much always more efficient than anything else in minecraft, though only late in game, when the player has already acquired large amounts of iron and has no other use for it. Up to that point, either coal, charcoal or wooden planks are your best choice. Even though blaze rods burn longer than coal (120 sec. vs 80 sec.), blaze rods are often take much longer to acquire in large quantities, even if you use a blaze farm.

The efficiency of charcoal and wooden planks have been explained in further detail in the charcoal article. The full article on fuel efficiency can be found here.

Cookies


Dec value: 357
Hex value: 165
Hunger restoration: 2 hunger bar slot
Hunger saturation: 0.8
Maximum stack 64

Cookies are created with cocoa beans and 2 wheat, which will result in 8 cookies. Compared to other food sources cookies are one of the worst food items. They restore only 2 hunger bar slot and 0.8 hunger saturation. Which is a low ratio compared to most other foods. A stack of 8 cookies also only heals as much as 3 steaks, porkchops or mushroom stews.

Cows and pigs can be found and bred easily, so using the 2 wheat required to create the cookies is often better spent on breeding cows, which has a higher meat drop yield than pigs. If you’re looking for a quick bite to restore the last 1 or 2 hunger bar slots, melon slices are the better choice, though cookies are easier to obtain if you don’t have any melon seeds.

Farming cookie ingredients

If you do want cookies, the ingredients are not that easy to obtain. Wheat is easy to farm, but cocoa beans can currently only be found in dungeon chests.

Farming wheat is very easy. You start by planting seeds on farmland, which will grow into wheat over time. The seeds will require light of level 9 and hydrating the farmland will increase the growth speed. After a while the seeds will have grown through several stages and reach maturity, at which point the wheat can be harvested. You can use bone meal on the planted seeds to instantly grow the wheat, no matter at which growth state it is. Full details on farming can be found here.

Minecraft rainbow runner – Mini game

Rainbow runner is a great mini game in which you dodge waves of blocks pushed up by pistons, much like a Guitar Hero game. This game was originally designed by Minecraftpg5, who creates many more incredible redstone contraptions, like his recent rapid fire TNT cannon.

The aim of rainbow runner is pretty much to survive for as long as possible, as failing to dodge a line will mean you get pushed into lava above you. You can set your own rules and change the game to your own liking, for example, you could expand the amount of rows, set a specific time people have to survive or give people a certain amount of lives before they lose the game, by simply replacing the lava with something else.

Although this mini game requires a lot of redstone, building it isn’t too difficult and only requires a basic understanding of redstone. It’s easier to build this mini game in different layers, working from the bottom to the top and then to the sides.

Building the first rows

I find it’s easiest to begin building the middle 2 rows. As you can see in the image below, all you need to build right now are 2 rows of redstone torches on top of blocks (in my case they’re on stone). My rows are 15 blocks long, but you can make it longer or shorter if you want.

At the sides of each row are redstone repeaters, each without an added delay. This repeaters are all connected to detector rails, which are part of a longer minecraft track which contains a lot of powered rails, which we need to make sure the minecart keeps riding. We will worry about a stop and starting mechanism later.

Keep building up the middle rows by constantly placing redstone torches on stone and stone on redstone torches untill you’ve created 6 rows on top of each other. If you want a rainbow runner with 8 lines, build it up 8 rows high, if you only want 4 rows, build up 4 rows high. For every 1-2 rainbow dodge lines you add or remove, go up or down 2 rows in height, but make sure your height is always an even number.

Next we expand the number of rainbow lines.

Adding rows

Adding rows isn’t difficult at all. All you pretty much do is repeat step 1, but on different heights to avoid colliding minecarts and redstone circuits.

Make sure you build each minecart track on the odd rows (first, third, fifth, etc). Building it on the even rows will cause the pistons to activate at the wrong times. Also remember to add lines of redstone torches to make sure the right line of pistons will be activated. This pretty much means row 3 will be 4 lines of redstone torches wide, row 5 will be 6 rows of torches wide, and so on.

As you add minecart tracks, you may already want to start with randomizing the sizes of the tracks a little. This is to ensure the rainbow rows you have to dodge don’t always came towards you in the same pattern. We will add upon this later in the article.

Playing booth

Now that we’ve pretty much finished the rainbow part it’s time to build the part in which the players will stand and dodge the rainbow.

All you really have to do is build a small booth with a 1 block wide line on top of the rainbow wool. Make sure the walls of this booth cannot be pushed up by the pistons below by removing the torches below it. It’s best to remove all the torches below it on all height levels, this will reduce any lag you may get from this mini game slightly, but every bit helps.

However, make sure you don’t remove the torches directly beneath the rows the plater is standing on, as this is the mechanism that will push the player up and indicates if a player failed to dodge the rainbow.

Add ladders 1 block above the wool the player will stand on and place lava on top of those ladders. Make sure the lava cannot flow anywhere, as this can be quite disatrous and annoying to repair. The lava will kill any player who fails to dodge the rainbow, as the pistons below will push the player up into the lava.
If you don’t like this deadly result, you could replace the lava with other blocks or just air. However, note that using anything that isn’t deadly will usually mean a judge will have to be present to check whether the player really failed to dodge the rainbow or not.

We also add an iron door, a lever (start stop button) and a pressure plate, which are explained in more detail below.

Start stop button

We don’t want to let this mini game go on forever, partially because it’s quite noisy but also because it could cause a server to lag, especially when other larger redstone mechanisms are active.

The lever in the player booth will both close and open the iron door from the inside, but it will also start and stop the game by locking the minecarts in place. The lever will activate corner pieces on all minecraft tracks, wich will cause the minecarts to ride up a ramp with powered rails. These rails are turned off, which is also done by the lever, which will slow down the minecart and keep it in place.

Pulling the lever again will power those rails and turn the corner piece back in the correct position, however, if this happens at the same time, the minecart will go into the wrong position, which is why we add a repeater on a 4 tick delay to the circuit powering the corner piece, as seen in the images below.

This power from the lever is transfered down by using a couple of redstone torches attached to floating blocks, with redstone dust on top of those blocks. Each block is placed below another torch, which continues from the top to the bottom.

We’ve also placed a pressure plate at the door to make sure people can still enter if somebody decides to close the door from the outside by pulling the lever.

Now we’ve pretty much finished everything, though you may want to expand some of the minecart tracks to randomize the way the rainbow lines come towards the player a little, if you haven’t done so already. Try to make sure none of the tracks are the same size, as this will mean those 2 rails will always come towards the players at the same times, which makes it easy for the players to time their moves.

Download links

Support link – Schematic Direct link – Schematic
Support link – World save Direct link – World save

How to Install Minecraft Mods

Minecraft mods are a great way to spice up your game, whether it’s a small mod which simply enhances the graphics or a big mod which completely changes the game. However, each mod is installed in the same way.

Installing mods isn’t very difficult, but many people are confused about how to do it. Then there are also issues involved with installing multiple mods, as not all mods work (well) together.

To install a mod you first need to find the folder in which you have to install it and that’s the step most people are often confused about.

Finding the folder

To file you have to install the mods in is called minecraft.jar, which is found in the bin folder in your .Minecraft folder.

To find the .Minecraft folder, either go to C:Documents and Settings*USER*Application Data.Minecraft (replace *USER* with your windows account name) or enter %appdata% in the windows search bar, then open roaming -> application data -> .Minecraft.

Note, you may need to reveal hidden files before you can see the application data folder. This is done by opening any folder, then click on “tools” in the tools bar at the top, then click folder options. A pop up will appear with a list, click on the view tab and scroll down to “Hidden files and folders”, tick the “Show hidden files and folders” box.

Once you’ve found the .Minecraft folder, open the bin folder and then open the Minecraft.jar file with a program like 7zip or winzip. You may need to right click the file and select “open with” and select the program manually. If you don’t have such a program, you can download 7zip for free.

Once you’ve opened this file, all you need to do is open the mod you’ve downloaded with the same program you opened the jar file with and move all the folder inside it to the minecraft.jar file.

However, please read the post you’ve downloaded the mod from to see if there are any special instructions. Some mods require you to move some files to other folders, like mods which use special sounds. Those files are often moved to the config folder and the mod folder in the .minecraft folder, though as mentioned, it depends on the mod you want.

IMPORTANT: If the mod you’re installing is the first mod you’re installing, you will most likely have to delete the META-INF folder inside the minecraft.jar file. If you don’t, starting Minecraft will cause you to only see a black screen.

The META-INF folder doesn’t return the next time you want to instal a mod, so you will only have to delete it once.

You may also have noticed many of the nature-type blocks, like grass, vines and ferns, are gray. This is because a light shader is applied to them in game, which is what makes every biome look different.

If you want to change the colour of the grass in biomes, you will have to alter the shader, which can be found in the misc folder in the Minecraft.jar, the files are called foliagecolor.png and grascolor.png, however, editing these files isn’t as easy as editing the other textures, so I’d advise you to leave this file alone until you’ve gained some experience. We will cover those files in a future texture pack guide (probably part 2).

Mod compatitibily

Not all mods can be used together, as some mods will use or edit the same files. This confuses a lot of people as they don’t know why or how to check what doesn’t work together, but it’s actually quite easy.

To find out whether 2 mods can work together, simply move all the files inside the file to a folder, just like you’d move the files into the minecraft.jar file. If the mods use the same files, moving the files into the same folder will cause windows to alert you of 2 files with the same name. This usually means the mods cannot work together and means you have to find an alternative.

However, don’t think mods cannot work together because they have the same folder. Folders can be the same, but files cannot. The difference between a folder and a file is that a file is placed inside a folder. For example, an image called image.jpeg will be placed inside a folder called images. While it’s fine to merge 2 folders called images, it’s impossible to merge 2 files called image.jpeg.

Note that this method doesn’t hold when you move folders into the minecraft.jar file, as the mods use altered versions of the minecraft files which allow Minecraft to work together with that mod.

Some mods require another mod to work. This will generally always be mentioned in the post you download the mod from and the mods you need are usually modloader and similar mods, which can often be downloaded in the same post. Those mods are qutie small and are installed in the same way as normal mods.

A final note, some mods can work together despite using the same files. Some files are merely used to indicate what ID number a block has or which texture to use on a mob. These files can be edited to allow both mods to access the same files, or in the case of textures, you will have to choose which texture you like best and use that.

How to Make Minecraft Texture Packs

A minecraft texture pack is a great way to customize the look and feel of your minecraft world, but it also allows you to create various tricks and hidden items by altering specific items, like paintings or lava. By creating a texture pack, you can also change blocks to look like something else, which is perfect for blocks you rarely or never use normally, for example, you could change the sponge block to look like a different kind of stone.

Creating a texture pack may seem quite difficult, especially finding the files you need to alter may seem a bit tricky, but it’s actually quite easy, depending on how experienced you are with graphic editing.

Note that this guide will not tell you how to make something look like stone, grass or wood, but instead we will tell you where you can find each file and a few basic tips and tricks to help you create your own texture pack.

Finding the textures

Of course, before you can alter any texture, you first need to find them. Like most files, the textures are inside the Minecraft jar file, which can be found in the .Minecraft folder.

To find the .Minecraft folder, either go to C:Documents and Settings*USER*Application Data.Minecraft (replace *USER* with your windows account name) or enter %appdata% in the windows search bar, then open roaming -> application data -> .Minecraft.

Note, you may need to reveal hidden files before you can see the application data folder. This is done by opening any folder, then click on “tools” in the tools bar at the top, then click folder options. A pop up will appear with a list, click on the view tab and scroll down to “Hidden files and folders”, tick the “Show hidden files and folders” box.

Once you’ve found the .Minecraft folder, open the bin folder and then open the Minecraft.jar file with a program like 7zip or winzip. You may need to right click the file and select “open with” and select the program manually. If you don’t have such a program, you can download 7zip for free.

All the textures you need are in this jar file, but they’re not all in the same place. Most textures can be found in the folders inside the jar file, for example, the mob textures are inside the mob folder and the armour textures are inside the folder called armor. However, you’re probably after the block textures, which aren’t inside a separate folder but somewhere in the long list of the files in the jar folder. The file you need is called terrain.png

Terrain.png contains all the textures used for all the blocks in Minecraft, but it’s important to know that many blocks use more than 1 texture and many blocks share the same textures.
For example, a pumpkin has a texture for the sides, the face and the top. The texture for the top is also applied to the bottom.

You may also have noticed many of the nature-type blocks, like grass, vines and ferns, are gray. This is because a light shader is applied to them in game, which is what makes every biome look different. If you want to change the colour of the grass in biomes, you will have to alter the shader, which can be found in the misc folder in the Minecraft.jar, the files are called foliagecolor.png and grascolor.png, however, editing these files isn’t as easy as editing the other textures, so I’d advise you to leave this file alone until you’ve gained some experience.

Editing the textures

Now that you know how to access the files it’s time to edit them to your pleasing. Note that a full list of all the textures and their position in the jar file can be found lower in this article.

Editing the files can be done with any image editing program, though keep in mind that some blocks may need to be transparent, depending on how you edit them. This means you cannot use paint, as it won’t allow you to make or save the files with transparency. If you’re looking for a program which does allow this, gimp can be downloaded for free and is one of the programs used by most texture pack creators.

While there isn’t really a right or wrong way of creating textures, some will, of course, look better than others. If you’re new to texture editing, you may want to start with simply recolouring the default texture pack and adding small changes, this will give you some experience and make you more familiar with how textures are created, how they look and how they affect the look of the game.

Note that it’s important to keep all the files the same size and the same format (.png), as well as the same name. So don’t save terrain.png as terrain.gif or blocks.png, your textures will not be loaded if you do.

List of textures

terrain.png

Found in the Minecraft.jar file and contains all the textures for all the blocks in Minecraft. Note that the texture for the chests is no longer used, instead, the texture for chests can be found in the item folder.

particles.png

Found in the Minecraft.jar file and contains all the textures for smaller particle effects, like torch flames, fishing rod bobbers and rain drops hitting the ground.

pack.png

Found in the Minecraft.jar file. It’s an image used as a thumbnail for the texture pack in the list of texture packs, this image has to be 128×128 pixels.

pack.txt

Found in the Minecraft.jar file and is used to write a description for your texture pack. Note that the description has to be short or it won’t show up under the thumbnail in the texture pack list.

title folder

This folder contains the Minecraft and mojang logo, as well as panorama pictures and the splashes.txt file. The splashes.txt file contains all the short messages you see in the main menu of Minecraft. This folder also contains the bg folder, which contains 6 panorama images used for the main menu background.

environment folder

Contains the textures for clouds, light, rain and snow.

font folder

Contains the font styles used for Minecraft. These are the fonts used for all text written in Minecraft, like everything you write on a sign.

terrain folder

Contains the textures for the sun and the moon. Note that the sun and moon move in circles, so any images or texts you put on it will be flipped upside down for half the time of the day and night (when both them are setting).
Also note the texture is mirrored horizontally in Minecraft, so [ will look like ].

item folder

Contains the textures for books, arrows, boats, signs, xporbs, chests and minecarts. Note that the powered minecart and the minecart with chest will use the furnace and chest texture, they don’t have a separate texture.

gui folder

Contains the textures for all the interfaces of the game (except for the achievement gui), like your inventory, the enchantment table interface, as well as textures for all the item images for your inventory, textures for the game icons (like the health bar) and other small icons.

art folder

Contains the image used for all the paintings in game. Note that all the paintings will have to be the same size as the original. Also note that adding paintings on the empty spaces will not give you more paintings (without using mods).

mob folder

Contains all the textures for all the mobs. The textures for the villagers and the Ender dragon have been placed in a separate folder (enderdragon and villager) and they contain multiple textures. Alter ender.png in the enderdragon folder to change the look of the ender dragon.

armor folder

Contains the textures for all the armour pieces in Minecraft.

achievement folder

Contains the textures used for the achievement interface.

misc folder

Contains the textures used for the biome shaders (grass and foliage colours), the pumpkin helmet view, the background for the maps, water colours, explosions and various other (light) effects.

Clock


Dec value: 347
Hex value: 15B
Maximum stack 1

Clocks are round objects that tell the time by showing the position of the sun and the moon. The sun and moon are displayed in the inner section of the clock and half of it is hidden to represent the horizon.

Clocks are created using 4 gold ingots and a lump of redstone dust, which mean they’re usually only obtained later in game. The clock will even tell the time while it’s being crafted. By placing the required items in the crafting table, the clock in the result slot will tell you the time.

Telling the time

Telling time on the clocks is very easy. When the sun is up in the middle it’s midday. If the moon is the middle it’s midnight. If the sun is partially hidden on the right side, it’s dusk. If the moon is partially hidden on the right side it’s dawn.

Clocks are very useful to get a more accurate time of the day, especially when people have set the view distance to low or tiny, as it will block out the sun. It will also tell you whether it’s safe to come out of your mine or whether it’s possible to sleep. Clocks don’t work in the End or the Nether, as neither dimension has a day and night cycle. The clock will spin around randomly instead.

Alternative methods

If you don’t have a clock it’s still possible to tell time by using a few tricks. The easiest way is to simply keep track of real time. Day and night cycles last 20 minutes, so by simply remembering at what time the sun came up you can always tell almost exactly what time it is in minecraft.

Depending on how deep you are, building a sky light could be a perfect solution. As long as you’re not near void fog levels (bottom 16), telling the color of the sky should be easy to do. However, if you’re going really deep, the chance of digging into lava or deep falls increases, so digging a safe skylight can take a while. The easiest method would be to dig a staircase system around a 1 block pillar and removing that pillar as you go down.

You could also change the view distance quickly as it will reload all the blocks around you. This allows you to see through the world for a brief moment and you’ll be able to see the sun or moon, or at least the color of the sky. This trick works better on slower computers.

When you’re mining a long tunnel, you may have noticed the fogginess behind you. The color of this foggy light will be white to light blue during the day and dark blue at night.

Dandelion Yellow


Dec value: 351:11
Hex value: 15F:11
Maximum stack 64

Dandelion yellow is created by crafting it from dandelions in any crafting interface. It can then be used to dye sheep and white wool blocks yellow.

Crafting recipes

Ghast tear


Dec value: 370
Hex value: 172
Maximum stack 64

Ghast tears are dropped by killing ghasts and are used to create potions of regeneration in brewing. They will only drop 1 tear, but it’s not a guaranteed drop.

Farming ghast tears

Farming ghast tears is a bit tricky as you’re mainly dependant on the amount of ghasts around. Then there’s also their flying ability, which makes getting to the dropped tear quite difficult. It could fall down a cliff, on top of another cliff or even into lava.

Killing the ghasts themselves isn’t very difficult. The easiest method is to stand in a safe spot, away from lava and cliffs, and to shoot back their own fireballs.
Make sure the ghast is not floating above lava or deep, hard to get to areas, you don’t want to spent more time retrieving the ghast tears than you spent on killing the ghasts. It only takes a single fireball to kill a ghast.

Note that the ghast’s fireball can set fire to all blocks and destroy weaker blocks. It’s advised to build a small stone platform to stand on in order to avoid ever lasting fires on netherrack and the destruction of the ground you’re standing on.

Magma cream


Dec value: 378
Hex value: 17A
Maximum stack 64

Magma cream is created by combining a slimeball and blaze powder in any crafting interface. It is also dropped by magma cubes.

Magma cream is used to created potions of fire resistance, which allows you to walk through fire and swim through lava without taking any damage. Potions of weakness can also be created with magma cream, though this potion can be created with several other, more easiliy available ingredients.

Farming slimeballs and blaze powder

Magma cream is one of the hardest obtainable ingredients due to the slimeball requirement. Farming blaze powder is quite easy. Blazes can spawn from blaze spawners found in the Nether fortresses, which makes it easy to build a safe room around the spawner to make killing them that much easier.

Farming slimeballs is a time intensive job, as slimes only occur in 10% of the chunks in the lowest 40 layers of the world. Tiny slimes are the only slimes that drop slimeballs (0-2 of them), so larger slimes first have to be killed in order to form smaller slimes.